Foundation (Foundation #1) – Book Review

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Published Date: 1951

Publishing Co.: Del Ray

Pages: 285

Goodreads Synopsis.

Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

When this began with the talk of mathematics and using it to predict the future, it almost lost me. Math has never been my subject, but luckily that part was short lived. There never came a point where I was absolutely hooked into the story but this is at the very minimum, one of the classics that I understand all the reasons why it is considered a classic. It still won’t be hopping on my favorite sci-fi list but it is one I would encourage other sci-fi fans to give a try. I like character driven stories and this is almost completely plot-driven and riddled with political intrigue.

The basis is that the Empire is going to fall in three hundred years and the scientists are attempting to save all possible knowledge on an unpopulated planet. The plan is to store the knowledge so that it is not forever lost and it can be redistributed to the galaxy. At least on the surface that’s the plan, in all actuality there is much more than just saving knowledge. There are mathematical projections and psychohistory theories about the challenges predicted to come and hidden messages to help the remaining humans of the empire along.

The story jumps from crisis to crisis in the first hundred years after the fall. Each crisis features a different character and details how they solve the problem presented to them.

I’m glad that I read it but I don’t think I’ll be continuing the series.

I did however end up with a copy of this from 1986 and had the gleeful pleasure of finding an old library card in the back from 1989.

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13 thoughts on “Foundation (Foundation #1) – Book Review

  1. yeah, characterization was never a strong point for Asimov. I suspect it had a lot to do with him growing up during the golden age of SF magazines.

    Glad you didn’t hate your time with it anyway -)

      1. Haha. I like that kind of thing too. It’s like having a peek into history on a more intimate level. I bought an old suit jacket from a thrift shop in the city once and found a horse betting ticket from the mid 70s.

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