Maplecroft – Book Review

I have waited quite some time to read this book, so when I found it at a book sale for $2 I was pretty pumped. Now that I’ve finished it, I’d have to say that had I paid full retail price for this novel, I would be pretty disgruntled right now.

Now don’t take that as this is a bad book, it’s not. It’s well written, plot driven, mildy entertaining and chock full of paranormal shenanigans. The format is fun; journal entries, letters and newspaper articles tell the tale. However, I just never really connected with any of the characters. One thing I’ve learned about myself as a reader in the past year or so is that, if I can’t connect with characters, then I’m not connecting to the book no matter how great the plot and world building are. So, if you’re unlike me and care mostly about the plot, well you’ll probably be fine.

Lizzie Borden had to kill her parents. They were slowly turning into these creatures that may or may not try to kill her and her sister or anyone else they come into contact with. There you have the basis of our tale, two sisters trying to understand what and where these creatures come from and how they possess people.

Lizzie’s sister, Emma, is quite the twat. Sure it sucks, you’re suffering from consumption on a daily basis. But, your poor, sweet, misunderstood sister takes care of your every need day in and day out and you can’t even be remotely happy that she’s getting a little tail on the side? You don’t like the fact that someone else loves her and cares for her as no one else does? If Emma was my sister and this was her thanks to me for all the care and love I had provided her, I’d throw her ass down the stairs.

If I had any feelings for anyone, it would be the poor ax murderess.

The book did have some really on point stances about religion though:

“I’ve seen science change a patient’s diagnosis, but I’ve never heard a prayer that changed God’s mind about a damned thing.”

“We crawled primordial from the water, our grand-ancestors times a million generations; we escaped the tides, the sharks, and the leviathans of the deep, only to find ourselves on land – where we became the things we’d sought to escape, and we invented gods to blame. Not gods of the ocean, for we’d been to the ocean, and seen that the water was empty of the divine. Not gods of the earth, for we have walked upon the dirt, and we are alone here.
So we install our gods in the sky, because we haven’t yet eliminated the firmament as a possibility.”

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3 out of 5 stars

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5 thoughts on “Maplecroft – Book Review

  1. I’ve been there before with not connecting/caring about any of the characters. If a plot is strong or compelling enough it can carry you, but it’s a struggle. I remember I read Charles de Lint’s Memory and Dream years ago, and did not like the main character Isabelle. Granted my reasons for disliking her were pretty horrible, and I’ve grown up a lot from that, but the plot of that was very interesting so I still count it as one of my favorite reads.

    This book sounds like it could’ve been great, but it is nice to have feelings for at least one character. I’m happy you didn’t pay full price!

    1. It’s rough because it makes it hard for me to finish a book if that happens. But if that one thing had been fixed, it would have gotten at least 4 out of 5 stars from me. If I had really adored a character, it may have even made it to my favorites list.

  2. Nice review! I agree about characters being a major driving force in how much I enjoy a book when I read it. I’m far more likely to forgive a so-so plot with great characters rather than a nice plot with characters I couldn’t care less about. I guess that’s why it’s so amazing when you find a book that satisfies your need for a damn good plot AND has characters you feel for. 🙂 I gotta say, I really liked the quotes you included in your review as well. Especially the second one!

    1. There were many great things about it but that lack of character connection just kind of killed it for me. I must say that the summary of the sequel didn’t really do anything to get me wanting to continue either. You win some, you lose some but reading is always an adventure!

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